Covid-19 Part 2: More Coronavirus

April 24th, 2020

Most of what I put in my first blog post on the 2019-2020 Coronavirus (officially SARS-CoV-2, causing COVID-19) at the beginning of March still stands, but now that we have all been sheltering in place for over a month, much has changed as well. Therefore, I decided to start a new post, rather than edit the last one.

The first thing most people ask are the symptoms, and how to distinguish them from a cold, influenza or allergy.

Covid vs Cold vs Flu Vs Allergies

The second thing I am usually asked is about the how many people are affected. Currently, the best source for information on COVID-19 cases in the USA is Johns Hopkins University. The best source for local information on what to do is your local health department (this link takes you to the Los Angeles Department of Public Health coronavirus information page, for example) and your primary care physician.

StayHome

As I wrote this, California is “social distancing” and will remain so for a while. I think social distancing should actually be called physical distancing, because the point is to stay as far away from as many people as possible. When you do need to go out you can reduce your risk of catching anything, or passing on the virus, by wearing a mask (only for kids age 2 and above!), washing your hands frequently, leaving your shoes at the door, instead of tracking in whatever is on them inside your house, and bathing and changing clothes when you get home. 

20200420_144532Why you should wear a mask (click on the sentence).

How to make a mask.

How to wear a mask correctly

How to use gloves correctly.

Food safety.

Cleaning your home.

Babies and toddlers under age 2 should NOT wear a mask and should NOT have anything covering their mouth and nose, due to the risk of suffocation.

If you or your child accidentally gets cleaning fluid, or anything else that could be dangerous, in their mouth, nose, or eyes, and they are stable, in the U.S. please call poison control – a free, 24-7 service that lets you speak to a physician specializing in toxicology. The number is 1-800-222-1222, and should be in everyone’s phones. It’s also good when your child breaks a glow stick and gets the glow-juice in their eyes or mouth, for example.

A good source of information for parents is Healthy Children from the American Academy of Pediatrics. This link is to their post on parenting in a pandemic, and this one is information for families with kids with special needs.

Another common question from parents is “How did my kid get sick now, after they’ve been home for a month?!”. My colleague Dr. Iannelli addressed this in a comprehensive post here.

Finally, please be wary of where your information comes from, and what bias it might have. The pandemic has lead to a large increase in false information being passed around. NPR has a great comic (with cats!) to help us all spot faux information

FB_IMG_1587356743760

Stay home, stay safe, and be well!

The first thing most people ask are the symptoms, and how to distinguish them from a cold, influenza or allergy.

Covid vs Cold vs Flu Vs Allergies

The second thing I am usually asked is about the how many people are affected. Currently, the best source for information on COVID-19 cases in the USA is Johns Hopkins University. The best source for local information on what to do is your local health department (this link takes you to the Los Angeles Department of Public Health coronavirus information page, for example) and your primary care physician.

StayHome

As I wrote this, California is “social distancing” and will remain so for a while. I think social distancing should actually be called physical distancing, because the point is to stay as far away from as many people as possible. When you do need to go out you can reduce your risk of catching anything, or passing on the virus, by wearing a mask (only for kids age 2 and above!), washing your hands frequently, leaving your shoes at the door, instead of tracking in whatever is on them inside your house, and bathing and changing clothes when you get home. 

20200420_144532Why you should wear a mask (click on the sentence).

How to make a mask.

How to wear a mask correctly

How to use gloves correctly.

Food safety.

Cleaning your home.

Babies and toddlers under age 2 should NOT wear a mask and should NOT have anything covering their mouth and nose, due to the risk of suffocation.

If you or your child accidentally gets cleaning fluid, or anything else that could be dangerous, in their mouth, nose, or eyes, and they are stable, in the U.S. please call poison control – a free, 24-7 service that lets you speak to a physician specializing in toxicology. The number is 1-800-222-1222, and should be in everyone’s phones. It’s also good when your child breaks a glow stick and gets the glow-juice in their eyes or mouth, for example.

A good source of information for parents is Healthy Children from the American Academy of Pediatrics. This link is to their post on parenting in a pandemic, and this one is information for families with kids with special needs.

Another common question from parents is “How did my kid get sick now, after they’ve been home for a month?!”. My colleague Dr. Iannelli addressed this in a comprehensive post here.

Finally, please be wary of where your information comes from, and what bias it might have. The pandemic has lead to a large increase in false information being passed around. NPR has a great comic (with cats!) to help us all spot faux information

FB_IMG_1587356743760

Stay home, stay safe, and be well!