Covid-19 Part 3: What We Know & What We Should Do Fall 2020 Edition

We are learning new information about the pandemic and Covid-19 everyday, so this information is what I know as of October 1, 2020. Please check out all of the linked articles – they are underlined in this blog post, and should open in a new window when you click on them.

As a reminder, here is a good website for general information about coronavirus and the pandemic: Johns Hopkins Medicine.

COVID-19isolateExposure

Covid-19 is still much rarer in children than it is in adults, but cases have risen sharply since schools have opened, and overall cases have gone up. As this AP article pointed out, younger children were less likely to be affected, but teenagers were more likely than young kids to get sick, and cases are really going up in young adults (age 18-22).  Children are also less likely to be hospitalized, but if your child is one of the rarer cases to get sick enough to require hospitalization, to get MIS-C from exposure to covid-19, to get heart damage from covid-19, or even die, then exposure was not worth it. This is why I am currently NOT recommending in-person school or daycare for anyone. Another thing to consider with daycare or in-person school, is that for every regular cold/fever your child gets, they will likely need to stay at home and isolate for 14 days (this varies, please see the chart below and speak to your doctor for individual advice), since covid tests still have a pretty high false negative rate, and it is difficult to rule out covid without a 2 week wait. This generally means paying for daycare/school, but still needing to find alternatives for your child at home for weeks at a time. For a good blog post going over most scenarios of illness in a state with open schools, please see Dr. Stuppy’s recommendations. Here are 2 images copied from her blog about common scenarios for her school district:

I know virtual school is not fun – I’m having a very hard time with it myself! However, the risks of my child getting covid-19 are not worth the benefits of learning or socialization at this time. I enjoyed this comic from Vox about the stress of remote learning on parents. school_meme_18_1

Another reason you do not want your child (or anyone) having covid is that it can damage the heart. Even if someone just has a fever and sleeps it off at home with covid, and does NOT need to be hospitalized, the American College of Cardiology recommends a gradual return to play protocol. This is similar to what we do after someone has a concussion, so please see your pediatrician, and have them do a cardiac exam (listening to heart with a stethoscope, checking pulses with their hands, looking over the child in person), before resuming any strenuous physical activity.

Sports-EAO-Dean-Fig1

The safest thing everybody can do at this time, is continue to stay home and limit contact with other people. The biggest risk is spending time together with other people – the virus is spread by breathing in germs that are breathed out by other people, especially “superspreaders”, – so wearing masks and staying away from others is the only way to prevent the spread right now. Cleaning surfaces is nice, and may help prevent other infections, like staph, e coli, and RSV, but it is not a good defense against covid. Some even refer to this obsessive surface cleaning as “hygiene theatre“. UCSF has a nice summary of how masks protect us, and Johns Hopkins Medicine has a good blog with graphics on how to properly wear masks.

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Finally, now (as always), is a good time to talk to your kids about living a healthy lifestyle. Virtual school can lend itself to too many hours of screen time, too little time being active, and overeating. Combat this by setting up limits on your devices, using apps like Family Link on Android devices / Chromebooks (I like the features on this, espeically the ability to make time limits on individual apps), parental controls on Apple devices, Family Safety on Microsoft/ Windows devices (I find these controls to be very limited, and work best from the website, but not the app), and the Bark App for overall monitoring (I like the ability to designate certain apps during school hours, certain apps for free time, and the monitoring of text messages and websites by the app for dangerous content).

Winter-is-coming-FluShot

Encourage kids to be physically active for at least an hour a day. Take walks, jump around, do free yoga classes on zoom, or whatever you can manage. Remind your tweens and teens of the dangers about smoking or vaping, and that it can be especially harmful if they get covid (see the article linked here).  Encourage them to drink a glass of water instead of reaching for a snack. When they do want a snack, make fresh fruit and vegetables readily available. Encourage them to eat the rainbow! Don’t forget to keep everyone in your family up to date on all of their vaccinations! The last thing you want is to have a fever or cough or rash for any reason during a pandemic – even if you don’t have covid, you will miss school / work, and increase your chance of catching covid by needing to go out to the pharmacy and other places for help.

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Covid-19 Part 2: More Coronavirus

April 24th, 2020

Most of what I put in my first blog post on the 2019-2020 Coronavirus (officially SARS-CoV-2, causing COVID-19) at the beginning of March still stands, but now that we have all been sheltering in place for over a month, much has changed as well. Therefore, I decided to start a new post, rather than edit the last one.

The first thing most people ask are the symptoms, and how to distinguish them from a cold, influenza or allergy.

Covid vs Cold vs Flu Vs Allergies

The second thing I am usually asked is about the how many people are affected. Currently, the best source for information on COVID-19 cases in the USA is Johns Hopkins University. The best source for local information on what to do is your local health department (this link takes you to the Los Angeles Department of Public Health coronavirus information page, for example) and your primary care physician.

StayHome

As I wrote this, California is “social distancing” and will remain so for a while. I think social distancing should actually be called physical distancing, because the point is to stay as far away from as many people as possible. When you do need to go out you can reduce your risk of catching anything, or passing on the virus, by wearing a mask (only for kids age 2 and above!), washing your hands frequently, leaving your shoes at the door, instead of tracking in whatever is on them inside your house, and bathing and changing clothes when you get home. 

20200420_144532Why you should wear a mask (click on the sentence).

How to make a mask.

How to wear a mask correctly

How to use gloves correctly.

Food safety.

Cleaning your home.

Babies and toddlers under age 2 should NOT wear a mask and should NOT have anything covering their mouth and nose, due to the risk of suffocation.

If you or your child accidentally gets cleaning fluid, or anything else that could be dangerous, in their mouth, nose, or eyes, and they are stable, in the U.S. please call poison control – a free, 24-7 service that lets you speak to a physician specializing in toxicology. The number is 1-800-222-1222, and should be in everyone’s phones. It’s also good when your child breaks a glow stick and gets the glow-juice in their eyes or mouth, for example.

A good source of information for parents is Healthy Children from the American Academy of Pediatrics. This link is to their post on parenting in a pandemic, and this one is information for families with kids with special needs.

Another common question from parents is “How did my kid get sick now, after they’ve been home for a month?!”. My colleague Dr. Iannelli addressed this in a comprehensive post here.

Finally, please be wary of where your information comes from, and what bias it might have. The pandemic has lead to a large increase in false information being passed around. NPR has a great comic (with cats!) to help us all spot faux information

FB_IMG_1587356743760

Stay home, stay safe, and be well!

The first thing most people ask are the symptoms, and how to distinguish them from a cold, influenza or allergy.

Covid vs Cold vs Flu Vs Allergies

The second thing I am usually asked is about the how many people are affected. Currently, the best source for information on COVID-19 cases in the USA is Johns Hopkins University. The best source for local information on what to do is your local health department (this link takes you to the Los Angeles Department of Public Health coronavirus information page, for example) and your primary care physician.

StayHome

As I wrote this, California is “social distancing” and will remain so for a while. I think social distancing should actually be called physical distancing, because the point is to stay as far away from as many people as possible. When you do need to go out you can reduce your risk of catching anything, or passing on the virus, by wearing a mask (only for kids age 2 and above!), washing your hands frequently, leaving your shoes at the door, instead of tracking in whatever is on them inside your house, and bathing and changing clothes when you get home. 

20200420_144532Why you should wear a mask (click on the sentence).

How to make a mask.

How to wear a mask correctly

How to use gloves correctly.

Food safety.

Cleaning your home.

Babies and toddlers under age 2 should NOT wear a mask and should NOT have anything covering their mouth and nose, due to the risk of suffocation.

If you or your child accidentally gets cleaning fluid, or anything else that could be dangerous, in their mouth, nose, or eyes, and they are stable, in the U.S. please call poison control – a free, 24-7 service that lets you speak to a physician specializing in toxicology. The number is 1-800-222-1222, and should be in everyone’s phones. It’s also good when your child breaks a glow stick and gets the glow-juice in their eyes or mouth, for example.

A good source of information for parents is Healthy Children from the American Academy of Pediatrics. This link is to their post on parenting in a pandemic, and this one is information for families with kids with special needs.

Another common question from parents is “How did my kid get sick now, after they’ve been home for a month?!”. My colleague Dr. Iannelli addressed this in a comprehensive post here.

Finally, please be wary of where your information comes from, and what bias it might have. The pandemic has lead to a large increase in false information being passed around. NPR has a great comic (with cats!) to help us all spot faux information

FB_IMG_1587356743760

Stay home, stay safe, and be well!